CR for Weight Reduction seminar

CR for Weight Reduction seminar
Cognitive reprogramming for Weight Reduction

Who is this workshop for?
Anyone with an interest in how to reduce weight and keep it off
Therapists
Coaches
Teachers
Fitness Professionals
Health Professionals

This seminar is in no way a replacement for any prescribed medication; nor is it intended to contraindicate or supersede any medically diagnosed conditions or designed to treat anyone or make any recommendation’s learners deploy techniques as part of any treatment plan. The seminar is for educational purposes

www.nlp-trainingcourses.com

CR for Weight Reduction seminar

CR for Weight Reduction seminar – YouTube

CR for Weight Reduction seminar
Cognitive reprogramming for Weight Reduction

Who is this workshop for?
Anyone with an interest in how to reduce weight and keep it off
Therapists
Coaches
Teachers
Fitness Professionals
Health Professionals

This seminar is in no way a replacement for any prescribed medication; nor is it intended to contraindicate or supersede any medically diagnosed conditions or designed to treat anyone or make any recommendation’s learners deploy techniques as part of any treatment plan. The seminar is for educational purposes

www.nlp-trainingcourses.com

What does it mean to live fully in the present moment?

What does it mean to live fully in the present moment?

It means that your awareness is completely centered on the here and now. You are not worrying about the future or thinking about the past. When you live in the present, you are living where life is happening. The past and future are illusions, they don’t exist. As the saying goes ‘tomorrow never comes’. Tomorrow is only a concept, tomorrow is always waiting to come around the corner, but around that corner are shadows, never to have light shed upon, because time is always now.

 

‘The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, worry about the future, but to live in the present moment wisely and earnestly.’ – Buddha

 

If you’re not living in the present, you’re living in illusion. But how often are we worrying about things that have yet to come, how often do we beat ourselves up for mistakes that we’ve made, no matter how much time has passed? The answer is too much. Not only will living in the present have a dramatic effect on your emotional well-being, but it can also impact your physical health. It’s long been known that the amount of mental stress you carry can have a detrimental impact on your health. If you’re living in the present, you’re living in acceptance. You’re accepting life as it is now, not as how you wish it would have been. When you’re living in acceptance, you realize everything is complete as it is. You can forgive yourself for the mistakes you’ve made, and you can have peace in your heart knowing that everything that should happen will.

 

The worst part about living in the past or the future is that you’re giving up your personal power. If you’re not living now, you’re giving up your life. You’re surrendering your power to create. If there are changes you’d like to make in life, it’s best to do it now.

 

If you’re living in the past, you can’t do anything about it, it’s gone. If you’re worrying about the future, you’re living somewhere that doesn’t exist. It hasn’t happened yet. If you want to change your life, the only place you can do it is in the present. But first you need to accept life as it is. When it comes down to it your mind is the only thing keeping you from living in the present.

 

There are many people that can give you their opinion or their advice on why it is difficult to live in the present. Some will say it is because we live in abstraction, we live in the world of symbols. Some might say it is because we have awareness of the passage of time, or the illusion of time, it produces anxiety because we can look at the past and predict the future. I think all of these answers are partially true. Though the biggest reason we don’t live in the present is because we don’t shut up. That is, we constantly talk to ourselves.

 

As Alan Watts aptly put it,

 

“if we are talking all of the time, we never hear what anyone else has to say. In the same way, if we are talking to ourselves all the time, we are never listening, we have nothing to think about other than thoughts, and are never in relationship with reality”. (Watts, 1957)

 

As humans, we love to create stories. We love to listen to other people stories and compare them with our own. This is beautiful. In a way we could say that the entire universe is based on one collection of stories, a cosmic story. The problem is when we feel the need to create a story about everything, we are living entirely in the world of symbols. We confuse the world as it is, with the way we think about it, talk about it and describe it. Reality though, is not a concept. When we realize this we are able to return to a state of peace and stillness.

 

Mindfulness is a spiritual or psychological faculty that, according to the teaching of the Buddha, is of great importance in the path of enlightenment. It is one of the seven factors of enlightenment, which is a state of being in which greed, hatred and delusion have been overcome, abandoned and are absent from the mind. Mindfulness, which, among other things, is an attentive awareness of the reality of things, especially of the present moment, is an antidote to delusion and is considered as such a ‘power’. This faculty becomes a power in particular when it is coupled with clear comprehension of whatever is taking place.

 

The Buddha advocated that one should establish mindfulness in one’s day-to-day life maintaining as much as possible a calm awareness of one’s body, feelings, mind, and dhammas. The practice of mindfulness supports analysis resulting in the arising of wisdom. A key innovative teaching of the Buddha was that meditative stabilisation must be combined with liberating discernment. Mindfulness practice, inherited from the Buddhist tradition, is being employed in psychology to alleviate a variety of mental and physical conditions. It has been popularised in the West by Jon Kabat-Zinn. Despite its roots in Buddhism, mindfulness is often taught in the West independently of religion.

 

Several definitions of mindfulness have been used in modern psychology. According to various prominent psychological definitions, mindfulness refers to a psychological quality that involves bringing one’s complete attention to the present experience on a moment-to-moment basis, or involves paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally, or involves a kind of nonelaborative, nonjudgmental, present-centered awareness in which each thought, feeling, or sensation that arises in the attentional field is acknowledged and accepted as it is.

 

Bishop, Lau, and colleagues (2004) offered a two-component model of mindfulness: The first component of mindfulness involves the self-regulation of attention so that it is maintained on immediate experience, thereby allowing for increased recognition of mental events in the present moment. The second component involves adopting a particular orientation toward one’s experiences in the present moment, an orientation that is characterized by curiosity, openness, and acceptance. In this two-component model, self-regulated attention involves conscious awareness of one’s current thoughts, feelings, and surroundings, which can result in metacognitive skills for controlling concentration. Orientation to experience (the second component) involves accepting one’s mindstream, maintaining open and curious attitudes, and thinking in alternative categories. Training in mindfulness and mindfulness-based practices, oftentimes as part of a quiet meditation session, results in the development of a Beginner’s mind, or, looking at experiences as if for the first time.

 

Practicing mindfulness can help people to begin to recognise their habitual patterns of mind, which have developed out of awareness over time and this allows practitioners to respond in new rather than habitual ways to their life. Recent conceptualizations suggest that mindfulness training improves the self-regulation of attention (Bishop et al., 2004). Although the systems that support attention are presumably involved, objective third-person measures of attention have seldom been used in research of mindfulness training. Instead, the bulk of studies have used introspection or standardized self-report data as dependent measures (Grossman et al., 2004).

 

There is much to gain from a more precise investigation of the role of attention in mindfulness training. If changes in attentional functions are associated with mindfulness training, further investigations could be conducted to explore whether or not these changes correspond to observable clinical benefits. This information could help clinicians to develop, implement, and evaluate mindfulness-based treatments. In addition, an understanding of the relationship between attention and mindfulness training could advance current cognitive neuroscience models of attention. That is, just as neuropsychological results enriched models of attention by providing findings that highlighted specific disease-related performance impairments, studies of mindfulness training may provide attentional findings that highlight training-related performance improvements. Such findings could lead to further exploration of cognitive-neural systems that are resilient to damage, amenable to reorganization, and capable of improving efficiency of processing through training or pharmacologic treatment.

 

Numerous writings suggest that mindfulness training improves two disparate forms of attention described as ‘concentrative’ and ‘receptive’ attention (Brown, 1977; Pfeiffer, 1966; Delmonte, 1987; Semple, 1999; Speeth, 1982; Valentine & Sweet, 1999). In the former, attention is restricted to a specific focus, such as the breath. In the latter, attention is instead “objectless” and the goal is simply to keep attention fully ‘readied’ in the present moment of experience without orienting, directing, or limiting it in any way. That is, attention is receptive to the whole field of awareness and remains in an open state so that it can be directed to currently experienced sensations, thoughts, emotions, and memories. Whereas extraneous stimuli are considered distractors in concentrative attention, in receptive attention no stimuli are extraneous because attention is open to the entire field of experience.

Language skills for Coaching

Language skills for Coaching

So our objective for this particular article is that at the end of it you’ll be able to explain the importance of the use of language in coaching, you’ll be able to identify the impact of the way you say things to the person when you’re coaching, and you’ll be able to analyze the way language can be used to understand someone’s construction of the situation, and to aid change.

Let’s think first about how language fits into the creation of our model of the world and how it acts as one of the filters. So first of all, information comes into us through our senses. So we will see it, hear it, touch it, feel it, smell it, taste it.

And as we’ve seen from the communication model what we do is to turn that into our internal representation. And in that process we’ve deleted, distorted, and generalized it in order to make it a more manageable size for us to be able to deal with so the experience is changed by that particular process.

And then we take that into a new representation and we decide that we want to tell someone else about it and let some other person know about our experience. And so we will take that into a new representation and we’ll use this wonderful creation of ours of language to be able to share that experience.

language skills

So language does this remarkable job of letting us share our experiences, interpretations, thoughts with other people. And it’s a great gift that we have. And it’s important to remember that it does limit us too. I don’t know if you’ve ever had a really great experience and you’ve tried your very best to let someone else know about this experience. And yet however you use language there’s just not enough words, enough ways of being able to really tell someone what that experience was like.

I love walking and the other day I was lucky enough to be up in the Grand Canyon and I walked up to the top of the peak. And I don’t know if you’ve ever been there but when you get to the top of that you can just see from miles and miles and miles. And it was the most glorious sunny day. And you see, as I’m describing this it’s not easy for me to express to you completely exactly how wonderful I felt up there and what the experience was for me. Because language is a construction that we’ve made it’s limiting as well as being a great gift.

And then the other thing about it is of course that add it to our language and the way that we express things is the meaning that we make. Because we are just meaning-making machines, we are constantly taking information that’s coming into us and creating meaning from it. And when we make really useful meanings from situations then that helps us. And when we don’t, we sometimes get very stuck.

And then of course there’s grammar. We have grammar because those are the rules that we kind of all agreed on to the way that we communicate, the way we say things, and they’re there to help us understand each other even better. And it gives us a common way of expression.

But it’s also important to remember that sometimes because we stick to the rules that limits us too. Because the rules say we can only say things in a certain way. And so we have to say things or we think we have to say things within those rules otherwise people won’t understand us.

So language is fascinating and when you really pay attention to language then you learn so much more, think about how does this help us in coaching?

Well firstly, because of our ability to make meaning then your client is going to be making meaning of things all the time. And as a coach, if you listen very carefully to their language and the way that they use it, you can find out exactly how someone has constructed that model of the world and how they have created that meaning – and in all three parts of this article on language that we’ll be doing, we’ll be exploring this more and more.

So the first thing then in coaching is about being able to listen carefully to language. But of course the second thing is not only about listening to it but about how use language ourselves as a coach. And how we can use language to be able to help our client to make changes very easily and to be able to influence and help them in very powerful ways.

Let’s think about how we can use language to bring about change. Let’s imagine that you were helping someone to learn to ride a bike and you could say either these next two sentences. You could say to them; “You know, it’s really hard to learn to ride a bike. It’ll take you a long time to do it,” or you could say; “You’d be surprised how quickly and easily you’d pick it up.” So which one of those two sentences is true? I mean, who knows, really? Neither of them could be true or both of them could be true but the key thing is which one is likely to help the person to learn the quickest? And what are the presupposed suggestions that have been made in each of those sentences?

In the first one, it’s about being hard to learn, taking a long-time. And then in the second one it is totally assumed and presupposed that they will learn it and it’s just a question of how surprised they are about how quickly and easily they do it.

So what impact could each of those statements have?

And then let’s think about it, what about if it was the person themselves saying those things to themselves? If they were saying to themselves; “Oh, it’s going to be really hard to ride the bike,” or “I bet I’ll be surprised about how quick and easy I pick it up.” What difference do those two have?

So let’s investigate presuppositions by thinking about how we can listen to our clients in a different way. Presuppositions are the linguistic equivalent of assumptions and in every sentence that we say there are presuppositions. Otherwise, we’d have to explain everything in minute details each time.

So even at the most basic level if I say something like; “The dog followed the cat around the garden,” first of all, it presupposes that there is a cat, a dog, and a garden. And that the cat is in front of the dog because the word “follow,” is a label for having one person in front of someone else – or one thing in front of someone else. So presuppositions are what we have to assume for the sentence to make sense to the person who’s saying it.

As a coach, if you listen very carefully to the way that your clients are saying things this helps you a lot to find out how he or she has actually constructed their particular view of the world. So if someone is going to learn to ride a bike or to learn to do anything for that matter, and when you talk to them about it they say; “I just know it’s going to be so hard to do and I’m not sure I can do this,” it would be important to hear those presuppositions.

Because firstly, the sentence tells you that they presuppose it’s going to be hard. And secondly, that they’ve presupposed there is doubt about their ability to do it. If they wanted to have the greatest chance of success, as a coach, you would want to challenge both these presuppositions and help them create a view about it that’s going to be much more motivating, inspiring, and resourceful for them.

So here’s an exercise to start you off looking for presuppositions; in these sentences write down what you think are the main presuppositions or assumptions that have been made by the person who is saying them:

  1. I know the way my boss works, he won’t listen to me.
  2. The only way to handle this is to leave the job.
  3. Because of this new project I’m going to have to miss lunch.
  4. Being on-work experience means that I’m an inferior employee.

So how did you get on with doing those? It’s interesting, isn’t it when you start to pick more and more about the way a sentences is being constructed and how that person has constructed their model of the world.

Let’s think about the first one; “I know the way my boss works. He won’t listen to me.” What were the presuppositions in that?

The first one is that it’s possible to know how someone else works and thinks. Second is that this boss is not going to listen to her. And the third assumption that’s made in this sentence is that he or she is not capable of putting things over in a way that the boss will listen to.

So as a coach, you would want to challenge each of those and help the person think in a different way about the situation so that they can help to resolve it.

And what about the second one? If someone says to you; “The only way to handle this is to leave the job,” what presuppositions are in that one? Well firstly, it is that there’s only one way to handle a situation, and that leaving is the only option open to them.

Here again as a coach, you would certainly want to do some work about that and help them find new options, and new ways of being able to handle it if leaving the job was not something that they wanted to do.

How did you get on with the third one? This was the sentence; “Because of this new project I’m going to have to miss lunch.” What were the presuppositions in that one? Well the first one is that the person has assumed that there is a link between the new project and eating lunch or not. Secondly, they’ve assumed that the new project is the cause of missing lunch. And thirdly, it is interesting in terms of listening to the language they’ve said that “they’re going to have to miss lunch.” Because words like that; “have to,” assumes and presupposes that they have no choice, there is no other choice. It’s like they absolutely have to miss lunch. Here again as a coach, you’d want to look at those things.

And here’s the last one; “Being on work experience means that I can’t progress.” So what are the presuppositions in this person’s sentence? Well, they’ve assumed that their progress and being on work experience are linked together. And secondly, they’ve assumed that one thing means that they can’t do the other – and that you would certainly want to challenge with.

How did you get on with the third one? This was the sentence; “Because of this new project, I’m going to have to miss lunch.” What were the presuppositions in that one? Well the first one is that the person has assumed that there is a link between the new project and eating lunch or not. Secondly, they’ve assumed that the new project is the cause of missing lunch. And thirdly, it is interesting in terms of listening to the language they’ve said that “they’re going to have to miss lunch.” Because words like that; “have to,” assumes and presupposes that theyhave no choice, there is no other choice. It’s like they absolutely have to miss lunch. Here again as a coach, you’d want to look at those things.

And here’s the last one; “Being on work experience means that I can’t progress.” So what are the presuppositions in this person’s sentence? Well, they’ve assumed that their progress and being on work experience are linked together. And secondly, they’ve assumed that one thing means that they can’t do the other – and that you would certainly want to challenge with.

So listening to the presuppositions in the client’s language will let you challenge those things that they are just taking for granted. And it’s very often because the client has not challenged these assumptions for themselves that they’re not making all the progress that they really want to, and that they’re getting stuck.

So one of the things is about listening to presuppositions in our client’s language. Then of course the other thing was about the language that we use and what are the presuppositions in the language that we use as a coach. And thinking about the impact that that will have on our clients and how we can make it really easy for them to bring about change. And paying attention to our language, what is assumed in it is a really key skill in coaching and one that you’ll want to learn.

So let’s have a think about this sentence. What’s presupposed in this statement from a coach; “It’s always difficult moving into a new job and it’ll probably take you a long time to feel fully-settled in but I’m sure you’ll get there in the end